From Pangaea to Laurasia then Eurasia and Back!

A photo that tells us what ‘FRAY’ means. We could not find any better example to explain this word!

Our planet Earth
Our planet Earth in motion since ages

The animation above is an example to show what the word ‘FRAY’ means to us. We have presented a small description of how our Earth faced her wear and tear, and which even now is on the move, and how it is expected to unravel. If the story interests you, you can visit the links provided along with.

Pangaea or Pangea was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eras. It formed approximately 300 million years ago and then began to break apart after about 100 million years. Pangaea was the first reconstructed supercontinent and its global ocean was accordingly named Panthalassa.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangaea)

Pangaea
The blue Ocean surrounding Pangaea is Panthalassa

Panthalassa, also known as the Panthalassic Ocean, was the vast global ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea, during the late Paleozoic and the early Mesozoic eras. It included the Pacific Ocean to the west and north and the Tethys to the southeast. It became the Pacific Ocean, following the closing of the Tethys basin and the breakup of Pangaea, which created the Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian Ocean basins. The Panthalassic is often called the Paleo-Pacific (“old Pacific”) because the Pacific Ocean developed from it in the Mesozoic to the Present.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panthalassa)

There were three major phases in the break-up of Pangaea. The first phase began in the Early-Middle Jurassic (about 175 Ma), when Pangaea began to rift from the Tethys Ocean in the east to the Pacific in the west, ultimately giving rise to the supercontinents Laurasia and Gondwana. The rifting that took place between North America and Africa produced multiple failed rifts. One rift resulted in a new ocean, the North Atlantic Ocean.

The second major phase in the break-up of Pangaea began in the Early Cretaceous (150–140 Ma), when the minor supercontinent of Gondwana separated into multiple continents (Africa, South America, India, Antarctica, and Australia). About 200 Ma, the continent of Cimmeria, as mentioned above (see “Formation of Pangaea”), collided with Eurasia. However, a subduction zone was forming, as soon as Cimmeria collided.

The third major and final phase of the break-up of Pangaea occurred in the early Cenozoic (Paleocene to Oligocene). Laurasia split when North America/Greenland (also called Laurentia) broke free from Eurasia, opening the Norwegian Sea about 60–55 Ma. The Atlantic and Indian Oceans continued to expand, closing the Tethys Ocean.

Eurasia is the combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia, with the term being a portmanteau of its two constituents. Located primarily in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres, it is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean on the west, the Pacific Ocean to the east, the Arctic Ocean on the north, and by Africa, the Mediterranean Sea, the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean to the south.The division between Europe and Asia as two different continents is a historical and cultural construct, with no clear physical separation between them; thus, in some parts of the world, Eurasia is recognized as the largest of five or six continents.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasia

Pangaea Ultima (also called Pangaea ProximaNeopangaea, and Pangaea II) is a possible future supercontinent configuration. Consistent with the supercontinent cycle, Pangaea Ultima could occur within the next 250 million years. This potential configuration, hypothesized by Christopher Scotese, earned its name from its similarity to the previous Pangaea supercontinent. The concept was based on examination of past cycles of formation and breakup of supercontinents, not on current understanding of the mechanisms of tectonic change, which are too imprecise to project that far into the future. “It’s all pretty much fantasy to start with”, Scotese has said. “But it’s a fun exercise to think about what might happen. And you can only do it if you have a really clear idea of why things happen in the first place.”

Supercontinents describe the merger of all, or nearly all, of the Earth’s landmass into a single contiguous continent. In the Pangaea Ultima scenario,subduction at the western Atlantic, east of the Americas, leads to the subduction of the Atlantic mid-ocean ridge followed by subduction destroying the Atlantic and Indian basin, causing the Atlantic and Indian Oceans to close, bringing the Americas back together with Africa and Europe. As with most supercontinents, the interior of Pangaea Proxima would probably become a semi-arid desert prone to extreme temperatures.

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangaea_Ultima)

Thanks to WordPress (the technology in disguise) for taking these small leaps ahead in unraveling the world population back to one platform! High-Five!

Below is another example of FRAY that we found to be unique! Check it out!

http://alphaditya.wordpress.com/2014/08/23/fray/

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/fray/

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